Separation Anxiety: A Tutorial for Isolating Your System with Linux Namespaces 2


With the advent of tools like Docker, Linux Containers, and others, it has become super easy to isolate Linux processes into their own little system environments. This makes it possible to run a whole range of applications on a single real Linux machine and ensure no two of them can interfere with each other, without having to resort to using virtual machines. These tools have been a huge boon to PaaS providers. But what exactly happens under the hood?

These tools rely on a number of features and components of the Linux kernel. Some of these features were introduced fairly recently, while others still require you to patch the kernel itself. But one of the key components, using Linux namespaces, has been a feature of Linux since version 2.6.24 was released in 2008.

Anyone familiar with chroot already has a basic idea of what Linux namespaces can do and how to use namespace generally. Just as chroot allows processes to see any arbitrary directory as the root of the system (independent of the rest of the processes), Linux namespaces allow other aspects of the operating system to be independently modified as well. This includes the process tree, networking interfaces, mount points, inter-process communication resources and more.

Why Use Namespaces for Process Isolation?

In a single-user computer, a single system environment may be fine. But on a server, where you want to run multiple services, it is essential to security and stability that the services are as isolated from each other as possible. Imagine a server running multiple services, one of which gets compromised by an intruder. In such a case, the intruder may be able to exploit that service and work his way to the other services, and may even be able compromise the entire server. Namespace isolation can provide a secure environment to eliminate this risk.

For example, using namespacing, it is possible to safely execute arbitrary or unknown programs on your server. Recently, there has been a growing number of programming contest and “hackathon" platforms, such as HackerRank, TopCoder, Codeforces, and many more. A lot of them utilize automated pipelines to run and validate programs that are submitted by the contestants. It is often impossible to know in advance the true nature of contestants’ programs, and some may even contain malicious elements. By running these programs namespaced in complete isolation from the rest of the system, the software can be tested and validated without putting the rest of the machine at risk. Similarly, online continuous integration services, such asDrone.io, automatically fetch your code repository and execute the test scripts on their own servers. Again, namespace isolation is what makes it possible to provide these services safely.

Namespacing tools like Docker also allow better control over processes’ use of system resources, making such tools extremely popular for use by PaaS providers. Services like Heroku and Google App Engine use such tools to isolate and run multiple web server applications on the same real hardware. These tools allow

them to run each application (which may have been deployed by any of a number of different users) without worrying about one of them using too many system resources, or interfering and/or conflicting with other deployed services on the same machine. With such process isolation, it is even possible to have entirely different stacks of dependency softwares (and versions) for each isolated environment!

If you’ve used tools like Docker, you already know that these tools are capable of isolating processes in small “containers". Running processes in Docker containers is like running them in virtual machines, only these containers are significantly lighter than virtual machines. A virtual machine typically emulates a hardware layer on top of your operating system, and then runs another operating system on top of that. This allows you to run processes inside a virtual machine, in complete isolation from your real operating system. But virtual machines are heavy! Docker containers, on the other hand, use some key features of your real operating system, including namespaces, and ensure a similar level of isolation, but without emulating the hardware and running yet another operating system on the same machine. This makes them very lightweight.

Process Namespace

Historically, the Linux kernel has maintained a single process tree. The tree contains a reference to every process currently running in a parent-child hierarchy. A process, given it has sufficient privileges and satisfies certain conditions, can inspect another process by attaching a tracer to it or may even be able to kill it.

With the introduction of Linux namespaces, it became possible to have multiple “nested" process trees. Each process tree can have an entirely isolated set of processes. This can ensure that processes belonging to one

process tree cannot inspect or kill – in fact cannot even know of the existence of – processes in other sibling or parent process trees.

Every time a computer with Linux boots up, it starts with just one process, with process identifier (PID) 1. This process is the root of the process tree, and it initiates the rest of the system by performing the appropriate maintenance work and starting the correct daemons/services. All the other processes start below this process in the tree. The PID namespace allows one to spin off a new tree, with its own PID 1 process. The process that does this remains in the parent namespace, in the original tree, but makes the child the root of its own process tree.

With PID namespace isolation, processes in the child namespace have no way of knowing of the parent process’s existence. However, processes in the parent namespace have a complete view of processes in the child namespace, as if they were any other process in the parent namespace.

This namespace tutorial outlines the separation of various process trees using namespace systems in Linux.

It is possible to create a nested set of child namespaces: one process starts a child process in a new PID namespace, and that child process spawns yet another process in a new PID namespace, and so on.

With the introduction of PID namespaces, a single process can now have multiple PIDs associated with it, one for each namespace it falls under. In the Linux source code, we can see that a struct named pid, which used to keep track of just a single PID, now tracks multiple PIDs through the use of a struct named upid:

To create a new PID namespace, one must call the clone() system call with a special flag CLONE_NEWPID. (C provides a wrapper to expose this system call, and so do many other popular languages.) Whereas the other namespaces discussed below can also be created using the unshare() system call, a PID namespace can only be created at the time a new process is spawned using clone(). Once clone() is called with this flag,

the new process immediately starts in a new PID namespace, under a new process tree.

This can be demonstrated with a simple C program:

Compile and run this program with root privileges and you will notice an output that resembles this:

The PID, as printed from within the child_fn, will be 1.

Even though this namespace tutorial code above is not much longer than “Hello, world" in some languages, a lot has happened behind the scenes. The clone() function, as you would expect, has created a new process by cloning the current one and started execution at the beginning of the child_fn() function. However, while doing so, it detached the new process from the original process tree and created a separate process tree for the new process.

Try replacing the static int child_fn() function with the following, to print the parent PID from the isolated process’s perspective:

Running the program this time yields the following output:

Notice how the parent PID from the isolated process’s perspective is 0, indicating no parent. Try running the same program again, but this time, remove the CLONE_NEWPID flag from within the clone() function call:

This time, you will notice that the parent PID is no longer 0:

However, this is just the first step in our tutorial. These processes still have unrestricted access to other common or shared resources. For example, the networking interface: if the child process created above were to listen on port 80, it would prevent every other process on the system from being able to listen on it.

Linux Network Namespace

This is where a network namespace becomes useful. A network namespace allows each of these processes to see an entirely different set of networking interfaces. Even the loopback interface is different for each network namespace.

Isolating a process into its own network namespace involves introducing another flag to the clone() function call: CLONE_NEWNET;